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Dr. LIN, Carlos Yu-Kai

PhD, University of Southern California
MS, London School of Economics and Political Science

Assistant Professor

Contact Information

Office: YEUNG-B7706
Phone: (852) 3442 8773
Fax: (852) 3442 0359
Email: carlos.lin@cityu.edu.hk
Web: -
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Research Interests

  • Intellectual history of modern China
  • Modern Chinese literature
  • History of Chinese fiction
  • Late Qing and Early Republican Literary Discourses

Teaching Interests

  • Translation studies
  • East Asian cinema and cultures
  • Modern Chinese literature
  • Chinese fiction and drama
  • Sinophone studies
  • Comparative and world literature
  • Bilingual literatures
  • Literary and critical theories

Last updated: 30 August 2019

Carlos Yu-Kai Lin is a scholar of intellectual history of modern China. His research focuses on late Qing and early Republican literary discourses, history of Chinese fiction, modern Chinese literature and culture, world literary theories and comparative literature, Sinophone and translation studies. He had taught at UC Berkeley, Davis, University of Pennsylvania, and Princeton University before he came to join the City University of Hong Kong in 2019.

From 2017 to 2019, Dr. Lin had launched and spearheaded two international collaborative projects that aim to revitalize the studies of the May Fourth Movement—arguably the most decisive socio-political movement that shaped the history of modern China—in the Anglophone world. The first project has resulted in the volume Remembering May Fourth: The Movement and its Centennial Legacy (co-edited with Victor H. Mair) (Leiden, Boston: Brill; forthcoming in 2019) which examines the theoretical utility and relevancy of the movement’s discourses in the twenty-first century world. The second project, titled New Keywords of May Fourth Studies, is launched in 2019 and seeks to intervene and redefine and the field of “May Fourth studies” by proposing new cognitive frameworks and theoretical vocabularies for understanding and analyzing the movement’s innovative and experimentative cultural tradition.

Aside from the collaborative projects, Dr. Lin also has a monographic study in progress. His latest project, Cold War and the Chinese Revolution: The Rise and Fall of May Fourth Studies in the U.S., investigates the rise and fall of “May Fourth studies” in the U.S. over the course of the twentieth century. He traces the U.S-based scholars’ changing perception of the Chinese revolution in the May Fourth era, examining how the American cultural elites’ awareness of the significance of the movement had been facilitated by the U.S.’s growing interest in the rise of Chinese Communism during the first half of the twentieth century. Dr. Lin points out that the emergence and eventual decline of “May Fourth studies” in the U.S. is in tandem with and thus closely related to the rise and fall of the Cold War, in which the U.S. was struggling to readjust its role in a new world order while seeking to assess and predict the future development of China—a process that conditioned and shaped the American sinologists’ understanding and evaluation of the May Fourth Movement.

Research Grants (as Principal Investigator)

2017-19     Faculty Research Travel Grants, Center for East Asian Studies, University of Pennsylvania.

2010-14     Summer Research Grant, Dana and David Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences,

                  University of Southern California.

2014          Travel Grant, Chiang Ching-Kuo Foundation for International Scholarly Exchange.

2013          USC Research Enhancement Fellowship (Nominated).

2013          USC Gold Family Graduate Fellowship (Nominated).

2012          Tsai Family Research Fund for Taiwan Studies, East Asian Studies Center,

                  University of Southern California.

2010          Best Presentation Award from the Symposium on “Animation to Reanimation:

                  Monsters, Myths and Media,” University of Southern California.

2009          College Merit Fellowship, University of Southern California.

Selected Publications (in recent 6 years)

Books

Remembering May Fourth: The Movement and its Centennial Legacy. (co-ed. with Victor H. Mair) Leiden, Boston: Brill (forthcoming).

Journal Articles

“Chinese Genres, Western Works-The Formation of the Idea of Foreign Literature in Late Qing China” in Modern China Studies. (2018) Volume 25, Issue 2: 178-195.

“Baihua as an Element: Reconsidering Hu Shi's Theory of Vernacular Literature" (Baihua zuowei yizhong xingzhi: Chongtan Hu Shi de baihua wenxue lilun) in Intellectual History. (2018) Issue 8: 289-338.

“Introduction to ‘Fiction as a Modern Literary Genre’ Project” in Newsletter for Research in Chinese Studies. (2017) Volume 36, Issue 3: 32-36.

Review of The Chinese Political Novel: Migration of a World Genre, by Catherine Vance Yeh. Chinese Literature: Essays, Articles, Reviews, (2016), 227-229.

“Double Inscription and the Concept of Origin in Lafcadio Hearn’s Kwaidan” in Theoretical Studies in Literature and Art. (2016) Volume 36, Issue 6: 169-183.

Review of Zhuangzi and Modern Chinese Literature, by Liu Jianmei. MCLC Resource Center: Modern Chinese Literature and Culture. URL: http://u.osu.edu/mclc/book-reviews/carlos-lin/ (2016).

“The Universality of the Concept of Modern Literature: Wang Guowei, Zhou Zuoren, and Other May Fourth Writers’ Conception of Wenxue.” Journal of the History of Ideas in East Asia. (2015) Volume 8: 343-400.

“The Rise of Xiaoshuo as a Literary Concept: Lu Xun and the Question of ‘Fiction’ in Chinese Literature.” Frontiers of Literary Studies in China. (2014) Volume 8, Issue 4: 631-651.

“A Radical Interpretation of Fromm’s Concept of Man.” (Fuluomu guanyu ren de gainian—yige jijinxing de quanshi) Con-temporary (Dangdai). Volume 210 (2005): 132-143.

“The Historical Position of Louis Althusser: the Epistemological Break of Marx.” (Atusai de lishi dingwei—makesi renshilun shang de duanlie) Con-temporary (Dangdai). Volume 203 (2004): 112-121.

“Four Phases of Alienation—A Study of the Temporality of Marx’s Concept of Alienation.” (Yihua de sige jieduan—makesi yihua sixiang de shijianxing kaocha) Hsiuping Journal of Humanities and Social Science. (Peer-reviewed journal) Volume 4 (2004): 1-26.

Book Chapters

“Introduction” in Remembering May Fourth: The Movement and its Centennial Legacy. Leiden, Boston: Brill (forthcoming).

“A Historical and Bilingual Perspective on the Concept of the Vernacular” in Remembering May Fourth: The Movement and its Centennial Legacy. Leiden, Boston: Brill (forthcoming.)

Conference Proceedings

“Cold War and the Chinese Revolution: The Rise and Fall of May Fourth Studies in the U.S.” (2019) East Asian Studies Program, Princeton University, USA.

 “‘May Fourth Studies’ and Its Contemporary Challenges.” (2019) May Fourth @ 100: China and the World 1919-2019. Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, Harvard University, USA.

 “May Fourth Movement and Its Contemporary Repercussions.” (2019) Association for Asian Studies Annual Conference, Denver, USA.

 “Situating Chinese Literature in the Global Context: Lu Xun as a Literary Historian.” (2018) Association for Asian Studies Annual Conference, Washington, D.C., USA.

 “A Reevaluation of the Esperanto Movement in Early Twentieth-Century China.” (2017) Association of Chinese and Comparative Literature Conference, The Chinese University of Hong Kong.

 “Hu Shi’s Conception of the Vernacular Language.” (2017) An International Conference on “Literature and Philosophy,” The Hong Kong University of Science of Technology, Hong Kong.

 “Vernacularity: New Approach to New Literature Movement.” (2017) Association for Asian Studies Annual Conference, Toronto, Canada.

 “The Language Reform and Esperanto Movement in Early Twentieth-Century China.” (2016) Annual Meeting of the American Comparative Literature Association, Harvard University, USA.

 “Literature as a Universal Idea: The Case of Chinese literature.” (2015) Organized by the Chinese History and Literature Working Group of the Doreen B. Townsend Center for the Humanities. University of California, Berkeley, USA.

 “A Conceptual History of Chinese Fiction in Late Qing and Republican China: Evolutionism and the Double Referentiality of Modern Literary Genre.” (2015) Biannual Meeting of the Association of Chinese and Comparative Literature Conference, Fudan University, China.

 “Defining ‘Literature’ in Pre-May Fourth China.” (2015) Annual Meeting of the American Comparative Literature Association, University of Washington, USA.

 “The Concept of the ‘State’ in Late Qing China.” (2014) Unpacking China: An International Symposium. Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, Harvard University, USA.

 “Articulating ‘Literature’ in the Chinese Context.” (2014) Annual Conference of Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association, UC Riverside, USA.

 “The Clash of Genres: The Negotiation of Chinese and Western Literary Forms in the late Qing Period.” (2014) Annual Meeting of the American Comparative Literature Association, New York, USA.

 “The Question of ‘Fiction’ in Chinese Literature: Reading Lu Xun in Two Languages.” (2013) Annual Meeting of the American Comparative Literature Association, University of Toronto, Canada.

 “The Cinematic Representation of Lioazhai Zhiyi.” (2012) Graduates Studying East Asia Final Meeting, University of Southern California, USA.

 “Fictionality and National Literature: A Re-examination of Lu Xun’s A Brief History of Chinese Fiction.” (2012) Global Lives: The 3rd annual Graduate Student Conference, Stony Brook University, USA.

 “Dis/location of Origin: Japanese Kaidan and Deconstruction.” (2012) Annual Meeting of the American Comparative Literature Association, Brown University, USA.

 “Tales That Cannot Be Told: A Strange Case of Japanese Kaidan Tales.” (2012) The 47th Annual Comparative Literature Conference “Drawing the Line(s): Censorship & Cultural Practices,” California State University, USA.

 “Techno Nezha: History, Culture and Politics in Taiwan.” (2011) Third Annual GPSS Poster Symposium, University of Southern California, USA.

 “Painted Skin and the Ideal Image—Negotiating the Ghost/Human Relation.” (2010) From Animation to Reanimation: The Symposium on Monsters, Myths and Media, University of Southern California, USA.

 “The Problem of Modernity: Rethinking Bodies, Sexualities, and Modernizations.” (2009) Risk Conference: Consortium for Literature, Theory, and Culture, UC Santa Barbara, USA.

 “In the Name of Others: The Problems of the 'Original' Name.” (2009) Global Languages, Local Cultures: Annual Meeting of the American Comparative Literature Association, Harvard University, USA.

Department of Chinese, Translation and Linguistics
Postal address: City University of Hong Kong B7704, 7/F, Blue Zone, Lift 3, Academic 1 83, Tat Chee Avenue Kowloon HK
Tel:(852)3442 8705, Fax:(852) 3442 0359 / 3442 0358, E-mail: ctlenq(at)cityu.edu.hk
2019/08/12 30 August 2019 Staff profile page contact Person description:
LIN, Carlos Yu-Kai Assistant Professor carlos.lin@cityu.edu.hk lt.cityu.edu.hk/images/People/Photos/carlos.lin.jpg (852) 3442 8773
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